Nutrition

Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Cancer Risk

(WellnessNova.com) - Vitamin D—a.k.a. “the sunshine vitamin” may help to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer if blood levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D are high enough, says new research.

The study, published in a recent issue of the journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by UCSD’s School of Medicine.

“We have quantitated the ability of adequate amounts of vitamin D to prevent all types of invasive cancer combined, which had been terra incognita until publication of this paper,” said Cedric Garland, DrPH, adjunct professor in the UC San Diego School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine and Public Health and member of Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health.

Other recent research ignited questions over whether or not recommended vitamin D levels have historically been to low, leading to numerous health issues including cardiovascular disease. Symptoms of low vitamin D levels are generally hard to diagnose, and can mimic other conditions.

In this recent study, the researchers noted age-adjusted cancer rates among those subjects who had higher vitamin D levels declined by as much as 67 percent.

The ideal RDA for vitamin D levels has been a topic of debate in recent years. While 600 IUs has been the daily recommendation for some time, other research points to doses of 800 or 1,000 IUs or higher, particularly for people over age 70 and women who are breastfeeding.

Written by Jill Ettinger
Jill Ettinger is a freelance journalist, editor, and marketing consultant. She is the senior editor and featured columnist on sister sites EcoSalon.com and OrganicAuthority.co,. Jill has been featured in The Village Voice, MTV, Reality Sandwich, and Global Rhythm, as well as the anthologies "Towards 2012: Perspectives on the Next Age" (Tarcher/Penguin) and "What Do You Believe?" (Outside the Box). Jill spent more than a decade as a sales and marketing manager in the natural foods industry and regularly consults with emerging brands and organizations in creative communication, social media, and marketing strategies. For more info, visit www.jillettinger.com. See more articles by this author
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